CampusProgram.com: University, College and Employment Resources that Guide you from High School to your Dream Job.

MENUHomeUniversitiesCollegesProgramsJobsLibraryArticlesStore
Google
 
Web www.campusprogram.com

Maryhill

Wikipedia Reference Information

Hew Hill, the Laird (Lord) of Gairbraid, had no male heir and so he left his estate to his daughter, Mary. She married Robert Graham of Dalsholm in 1763, but they had no income from trade or commerce and had to make what they could from the estate. They founded coalmines on the estate but they proved to be wet and unprofitable, and their property ventures are best known for an acre of ground they did not sell. It is still known as Acre today.

No doubt they would have continued with the struggle, but on the 8 March 1768 Parliament approved the cutting of the Forth and Clyde Canal through their estate, which provided some much-needed money. The canal reached the estate in 1775, but the Canal Company had run out of money and work stopped for eight years. The Government granted funds from forfeited Jacobite estates to start it again and the crossing of the River Kelvin became the focus for massive construction activity. Five locks, the great Kelvin aqueduct and, between two of the locks, a dry dock boatyard were built. A village too began to grow up and the Grahams fed more land for its development; Robert Graham attached one condition that was to immortalise the heiress of Gairbraid, his beloved wife and the last in line of centuries of Hills of Gairbraid after the death of her father Hew Hill. The then village was to be "in all times called the town of MaryHill".

The new canal waterway attracted boat-building, saw-milling and other industries such as ironfounding to its banks within Mary's estate. By 1830 the scattered houses had grown to form a large village with a population of 3000 people. With the building of the Glasgow to Helensburgh railway passing through Maryhill, and the proximity of the Loch Katrine pipeline, led to further growth and in 1856 Maryhill became a burgh in its own right (burgh is an old word for town in Scotland). It was later absorbed into the city of Glasgow in 1891.

The complete, up-to-date and editable article about Maryhill can be found at Wikipedia: Maryhill
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maryhill




MENUHomeUniversitiesCollegesProgramsJobsLibraryArticlesStore
Google
 
Web www.campusprogram.com

Copyright 1996-2007 - CampusProgram.com