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Hippie

Wikipedia Reference Information

A hippie or hippy is a member of a specific subgroup of the counterculture that began in the United States during the early 1960s, spread to other countries, and declined in the mid-1970s.[1] Hippies, along with the New Left and the American Civil Rights Movement, are considered the three dissenting groups of the American 1960s counterculture.

Originally, hippies were part of a youth movement composed mostly of white teenagers and young adults between the ages of 15 and 25 years old who inherited a tradition of cultural dissent from the Bohemians and the beatniks. Hippies rejected established institutions, criticized middle class values, opposed nuclear weapons (especially in the United Kingdom), opposed the Vietnam War (especially in the U.S.), embraced aspects of non-Judeo-Christian religions, championed sexual liberation, promoted the use of psychedelic drugs to expand one's consciousness, and created intentional communities. Hippies opposed political and social orthodoxy, choosing a gentle and nondoctrinaire ideology that favored peace, love, and personal freedom, perhaps best epitomized by The Beatles' song, All You Need is Love. They perceived the dominant culture as a corrupt, monolithic entity that exercised undue power over their lives, calling this culture "The Establishment", "Big Brother", or "The Man". Noting that they were "seekers of meaning and value," some described hippies as a new religious movement.

After 1965, the hippie ethos influenced the The Beatles and others in the United Kingdom and Europe, and they in turn influenced their American counterparts. By 1968, self-described hippies had become a significant minority, representing just under 0.2 percent of the U.S. population.[14] Hippie culture spread worldwide through a fusion of rock music, folk, blues, and psychedelic rock; it also found expression in literature, the dramatic arts, and the visual arts, including film, posters advertising rock concerts, and album covers. Eventually the hippie movement extended far beyond the United States, the United Kingdom and Europe, appearing in Australia, New Zealand, Japan, Mexico, Brazil and many other countries.

The complete, up-to-date and editable article about Hippie can be found at Wikipedia: Hippie
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hippie




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